Black propaganda losing its sting
posted 6-May-2019  ·  
407 views  ·   0 comments  ·  

Over the past weeks, a number of accusations have been aired not only on social media but also on the mainstream media regarding alleged connections of certain politicians with the drug trade.

Taking a cue from the Duterte matrix linking media personalities to an alleged plot to discredit and oust the president, unidentified persons posted clips of Duterte linking a governor and mayors to illegal drugs including the cocaine blocks found by fishermen in the ocean. Also getting views and comments on fb was a post containing a drug matrix again linking current candidates to the pernicious trade.

Just recently, shabu lab star witness Ernesto Tabor Jr. came out in the open to accuse another congressional candidate of sending hired guns to kill him. Unfortunately, the Catanduanes police failed to back his allegation and treated the alleged shooting incident as a mere discharge of firearm. The witness also failed to present corroborative proof of the candidate’s link to the shabu lab and neither did he answer the query on why he left this out in his initial testimony before the police in July 2017.

Such strategies and manipulations of the truth are commonplace during elections and become part of the political propaganda, or dirt as it deserves to be called, launched by rival politicians.

While the Department of Justice has indeed resolved to file charges of involvement in the shabu lab and drug trade against brothers Joseph Al-Randie and Jardin Brian Wong, the filing of the raps have been postponed indefinitely after Malacanang intervened and ordered the justice department to review the resolution.

It may be recalled that in the past elections, Governor Joseph Cua has been the recipient of virulent attacks on his alleged links to illegal drugs, something which the police or even the National Bureau of Investigation (NBI) has yet to prove beyond reasonable doubt.

Even without hard evidence, his political detractors have continuously pounded on this theme, scattering plastic sachets containing “tawas” on the streets on the eve of an election and claiming that the success of the Cua family’s group of companies is not due to their farsighted business acumen but to illegal drugs.

Nor could attackers of Cong. Cesar Sarmiento creditably claim the same drug links, as he obviously gets his campaign funds from a more mundane source that is known to almost all Catandunganons

Through the past decades, allegations of illegal drug connections have become commonplace that they are no longer given much thought by the electorate.

What is important to them is not only the capacity to bring home the bacon in terms of development projects but also the ability to extend almost any form of assistance, and instantly at that, to any member of the public who have come to ask for help.

With just 12 days to go before the May 13, 2019 elections, the voters’ main focus, having made up their minds as to their choices in various posts at stake, is for the candidates to finally launch their respective vote-buying campaigns.


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